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The Sydney Opera House

April 17, 2019

The Sydney Opera House

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The Model Itself Vanished More Than 35 Years Ago And Resurfaced Inside 24 Storage Crates At A Customs Warehouse In Western Sydney.

Interesting Facts On The Actual Study Model

The Sydney Opera House. DID YOU KNOW:

And you think you have competition? In the beginning, architects from approximately 30 countries submitted 233 entries. In January 1957 the judging committee announced the winning entry, that of Danish architect Jørn Utzon.

And then the politicians got involved. It is reported that “local government officials”, in their haste to get things moving, intentionally lowered construction cost estimates. Those estimates were never returned to the original numbers. Consequently, the project was “over budget” from the start. Utzon, who (unfairly) shouldered most of the blame, resigned from the project and returned to Denmark.

The final tab for the project was approximately $104 million – an absolute bargain by today’s measure. And, the entire cost was paid for by the Opera House lottery.

A handful of local architects were brought in to finish the project. However, it is widely accepted that the Sydney Opera House is most definitely Jørn Utzon’s design.

The Sydney Opera House helped define an entire nation. You can’t think of France without the Eifel Tower, or India without the Taj Mahal – that’s how important architecture is. Furthermore, the Opera House and its aligned venues were designed and currently operated to be as inclusive as possible, bringing the arts to everyone and anyone. That’s a nice way to be defined.

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