Skip to content
The Sydney Opera House

April 17, 2019

The Sydney Opera House

The Model Itself Vanished More Than 35 Years Ago And Resurfaced Inside 24 Storage Crates At A Customs Warehouse In Western Sydney.

Interesting Facts On The Actual Study Model

The Sydney Opera House. DID YOU KNOW:

And you think you have competition? In the beginning, architects from approximately 30 countries submitted 233 entries. In January 1957 the judging committee announced the winning entry, that of Danish architect Jørn Utzon.

And then the politicians got involved. It is reported that “local government officials”, in their haste to get things moving, intentionally lowered construction cost estimates. Those estimates were never returned to the original numbers. Consequently, the project was “over budget” from the start. Utzon, who (unfairly) shouldered most of the blame, resigned from the project and returned to Denmark.

The final tab for the project was approximately $104 million – an absolute bargain by today’s measure. And, the entire cost was paid for by the Opera House lottery.

A handful of local architects were brought in to finish the project. However, it is widely accepted that the Sydney Opera House is most definitely Jørn Utzon’s design.

The Sydney Opera House helped define an entire nation. You can’t think of France without the Eifel Tower, or India without the Taj Mahal – that’s how important architecture is. Furthermore, the Opera House and its aligned venues were designed and currently operated to be as inclusive as possible, bringing the arts to everyone and anyone. That’s a nice way to be defined.

Related News

For all the kids who enjoy playing with Legos…Strang partnered with Art + Lit + Lab to host students aged 11-14 at Strang’s Madison office to learn all about the world of architecture. As part of Art + Lit + Lab’s Summer Arts Camp, this program was all about teaching the fundamentals of architecture with interactive, hands-on learning.
Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestra recently broke ground on the construction of its new 40,085 SF rehearsal and performance space. The building will feature three state-of-the-art rehearsal halls, eight studios, nine practice rooms, administrative offices, and a music library. The music center is set to be fully operational in the fall of 2023.
When the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Mission Area (WMA) moved across town to the USDA Forest Products Lab building, they partnered with Strang to renovate the old, outdated 3rd floor into a fresh and collaborative space that spoke to the USGS’s core values. At 3,900 SF this office packs a lot of interesting features into every inch of the small space.